Transaction Modeling IDs Best Deal

Topic: Transaction Modeling

Financial projections don’t lie, yet the accuracy of each projection lies with the integrity of the numbers. If you’re a single user of property or space, transaction modeling is vital to negotiating the sharpest deal terms.

Intangibles (eg. loss factor) and tangibles (eg. free rent, escalations, and Tenant Improvements (TI)) become a baseline [of costs and concessions] to add to relocation expenses. Compare projection results to identify deal terms that meet your specific needs.

Make the Match

Identifying deal numbers reveals the “price” of each [building] choice to decide its worth/fit to your business. Commoditizing each deal positions you to focus on how the attributes of a choice meets the operating needs of your business and staff; prioritize choices to fit your needs.

Deal terms can be sharpened by knowing the owner’s cost to carry the building (i.e. operating, maintenance, utilities, TI costs, mortgage(s)) and softness for legal terms. An established commercial realtor who is well-versed with the local market may have these answers. (Note: I identified this for most deals I made; it contributed to negotiating sharp deals (business and legal terms) for each choice.)

Lease vs Sale

Lease. The business terms of a lease are created by crossing the cost and profit needs of the owner, with your budget needs, with the market value for the space. Knowing the owner’s rough property costs and softness for legal terms will help guide you to negotiate the sharpest business and legal terms of the lease. The content of each term sheet drives the financial model of the deal. (Note: renewal options and expansion rights are negotiable; each property owner addresses them to match the needs of their property).

Sale. Whether you’re selling a property or buying one, the most effective means of identifying its market value is to compare its the capped NOI to comps adjusted to the property. Rent of all space, less expenses, equals NOI, divided by a capitalization (cap) rate. (Accurate income and expense figures will produce an accurate NOI.) The offered price can be tuned up or down via the cap rate (1 point = 100 basis points). Compare the estimated property value to comparables, adjusting the comps up or down for differences to your property. The result will give you the property’s market value (and its ability to compete with comps). Capitalized Price Estimate

Caveat: When buying income-producing property, ask the seller to represent that the income and expense figures are accurate. Sellers often require buyers to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) before issuing their data; ask the Seller to add that representation to the NDA. (Note: If you’re dealing with a slippery seller, your CFO or CPA may need to negotiate obtaining reliable property figures.) Your analyst’s model of the data will reveal which property you’re reviewing is worth buying and is the most financeable. A sale contract (and deed) that protects the seller and buyer fairly is critical.

 

If your commercial real estate (brokerage or investment) business needs a savvy analyst for a lease or sale deal, who can also present with charisma, please contact me to discuss your specific needs. If I can be of help to your transaction, see Publisher’s Corner to learn how to hire me and my read my bio.

About Mayer Segal
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